Key Challenges

Responding to today’s key challenges

WE WORK TOGETHER TO RESOLVE ISSUES THAT A COMPANY CANNOT ADDRESS ON ITS OWN. BY DESIGN, OUR INITIATIVES REACH WELL BEYOND A SIMPLE SUPPLY CHAIN.

Our actions exceed the principles of the international conventions we honor, helping to identify and test solutions that improve, even more significantly, the income and living conditions of those who are dependent on production of our raw materials, all while respecting local traditions and cultures.

Our initiatives in Haiti (vetiver), the Comoros Islands (ylang-ylang), Honduras (styrax/liquidambar), Indonesia (patchouli, palm), India (mica), Morocco (argan and rosemary), Tunisia (rosemary), Benin City, Nigeria (Shea butter), Mexico (candelilla), El Salvador (Balsam of Peru), coupled with new initiatives currently being implemented, stand as testament to our commitment.

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Environment

Protect the environment, natural resources, their ecosystems. It is a matter of planetary survival, a consequence of our organizations. We have a shared responsibility. The stakes are staggering, but the answer is simple: take action together, humbly, relentlessly.

OUR COMMITMENT TO PRESERVING THE PLANET’S RESOURCES – ONE OF THE FOUNDING OBJECTIVES OF THE NATURAL RESOURCES STEWARDSHIP CIRCLE – MEANS ACTING TOGETHER TO HELP SIGNIFICANTLY REDUCE DEFORESTATION, SOIL EROSION, WATER, AIR, AND SOIL POLLUTION; IT MEANS FOSTERING USE OF RENEWABLE ENERGIES WHENEVER POSSIBLE.

Our primary concerns and capacities for action are designed to ensure that practices – along the entire production chain of the ingredients we use in composing our products – do not, over the long term, generate any negative impact on biodiversity, ecosystems, and the environment in general. This is a long-term commitment and investment, and one that we make with great determination.

See our initiatives in the Comoros Islands (deforestation), Haiti (erosion), Indonesia (palm), Mexico (air and soil pollution), and those in progress.

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Producer living conditions

WE HAVE A SHARED RESPONSIBILITY FOR THE LIVING CONDITIONS OF THE PRODUCER COMMUNITIES AND THEIR FAMILIES, THOSE WHO PRODUCE AND SUPPLY US WITH THE INGREDIENTS THAT COMPOSE OUR PRODUCTS.

The keys to success are ensuring transparency along the ingredient’s entire journey, from field’s edge to finished product; improving farmers’ incomes; equitable benefit sharing; locally implementing added value and making long-term commitments throughout the project along the entire supply chain. These lead to many potential advantages for everyone involved.

To achieve this goal, a Best Practices Guide is drafted, a text that is in keeping with the NRSC Charter of Commitments and in concert with local stakeholders in each supply chain impacted by our initiative.

This work goes beyond structuring the supply chain itself. It also entails mobilizing the means and skills to build the capacity of local actors to generate new wealth in their region: support diversification of their income sources, improve their day-to-day living conditions (access to drinking water, healthcare, education, training), and, last but not least, create a dynamic that uplifts, inspires, and brings hope to and for the younger generations.

See our initiatives in Haiti, Honduras, the Comoros Islands, Mexico, India, and those in progress.

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Human rights

IN KEEPING WITH THE COMMITMENTS MADE BY NRSC MEMBERS, AS ESTABLISHED IN THE FOUNDING TEXT, WE ADHERE TO THE PRINCIPLE OF THESE INTERNATIONAL ACCORDS:

• United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity (UN-CBD)
• United Nations Declaration of the Rights of Indigenous Peoples
• Global Compact
• International Labour Organization (I.L.O.)
• Nagoya Protocol
Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and French Duty of Vigilance Law

These commitments demand extreme vigilance on our part. Respecting the most fundamental human rights and, even more so, children’s rights, remains an absolute priority in our monitoring of global conditions and our choice of initiatives.

It also means we ensure proper working conditions, worker dignity and safety, and the health of farm workers, producers, and their families.

See our initiatives in India (child labor), Mexico (health and safety), El Salvador (health and safety), and those in progress.

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Benefit Sharing (Nagoya)

The NRSC’s founding goals and principles were developed in 2008, well before the signing of the Nagoya Protocol, demonstrating the proactive, visionary nature of our initiative and its members. The definition of Access and Benefit Sharing set forth in the protocol reflects these commitments, which are incorporated in the NRSC’s founding Charter of Commitments. Our initiatives are therefore rooted in our values, in our concerns, in our pursuit of real results from our field initiatives.

For each supply chain, we strive to go beyond the principles of Access and Benefit Sharing. In the supply chain’s Best Practices Guide, we include commitments that take into account the voice of the communities, their culture, traditions, and rights.

As the trailblazers we long have been, our 2018-2022 roadmap intensifies the application of Access and Benefit Sharing, making it central to all our efforts. A multitude of initiatives, seminars, experience-sharing, and workshops with representatives from indigenous communities and institutional organizations is developed throughout our new program.